Posts tagged with "ingredients"

Myth

Energy drinks have “high” or “dangerous” amounts of caffeine.

Fact

The vast majority of energy drinks consumed in the United States – including Monster, Red Bull, Rockstar, AMP, Full Throttle and NOS – have similar or lower levels of caffeine than home-brewed coffee which many Americans enjoy on a daily basis. And many contain about half the caffeine of a similarly-sized coffeehouse coffee. A 16 fluid ounce energy drink typically contains between 160 and 240 milligrams of caffeine, while the same size coffeehouse coffee contains around 300 to 330 milligrams. Moreover, caffeine has been safely consumed around the world for hundreds of years.

Source:Mayo Clinic

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Q & A

Q: Are low-calorie sweeteners safe?

A: Foods and beverages use many types of low-calorie sweeteners. Despite some of the internet myths that may end up in your inbox, these low-calorie sweeteners are safe. In fact, they have been approved by regulatory agencies around the world, including the World Health Organization, U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), as safe for use in foods and beverages.

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Q & A

Q: Does aspartame cause cancer?

A: No

People have safely consumed products containing aspartame for more than thirty years. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Joint Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) of the World Health Organization (WHO) and regulatory agencies in more than 100 countries have reviewed aspartame and found it safe for use. The American Medical Association, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (formerly the American Dietetic Association) and the American Diabetes Association also recognize aspartame as safe.

The sweetener has been tested continuously since its introduction and its safety has been consistently re-affirmed. A study conducted by government researchers at the National Cancer Institute involved over 500,000 people, including those who drank the equivalent of three or more diet soft drinks every day for almost a decade. It found that there was no increased risk of any type of cancer even among those who consumed the most aspartame. In fact, since aspartame was first introduced, no scientific evidence has been found linking it to any disease in humans.

Source:The U.S. Food and Drug Administration Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, FDA Statement on European Aspartame Study

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Fact:

There is no scientific evidence that caramel color, used in colas as well as many other foods, causes cancer or any other health concerns, in humans.

The science simply does not show that caramel color in foods or beverages is a threat to human health. In fact, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, a person would have to drink more than 1,000 cans of soda a day for a lifetime to match the doses administered in studies that showed any negative effect on mice.

Source:“FDA Skeptical Chemical in Sodas Harm Consumers,” Bloomberg News, March 5, 2012.

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Fact:

Most mainstream energy drinks contain about half the caffeine of a similar size cup of coffee house coffee.

Source:Mayo Clinic.

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