Posts tagged with "marketing"

Fact:

Energy drinks, their ingredients and labeling are regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and, as with most consumer products, their advertising is subject to oversight by the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC).

TAGS:

Fact:

Energy drink products first appeared in Europe and Asia in the 1970s, and became available in the United States in the late 1990s.

TAGS:

Myth

Energy drink companies target children.

Fact

Energy drinks are not intended for children.

The leading energy drink makers have voluntarily pledged not to market these products to children or sell them in K-12 schools. In addition, these companies voluntarily display an advisory statement on energy drink packaging, stating that the product is not intended (or recommended) for children, pregnant or nursing women, and persons sensitive to caffeine.

TAGS:

Myth

There’s no way for a consumer to know how much caffeine is in their beverage.

Fact

There are several ways to find out exactly how much caffeine is in your beverage. Most beverage companies voluntarily list the total amount of caffeine from all sources right on the label. In addition, this information is readily available on company or product websites, as well as through their toll-free numbers.

TAGS:

Myth

Energy drinks aren’t regulated.

Fact

Energy drinks, their ingredients and labeling are regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)— even those that are labeled as a dietary supplement using a Supplement Facts panel, instead of a conventional food using a Nutrition Facts panel. And, as with most consumer products, energy drink advertising is subject to oversight from the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC).

TAGS:

Q & A

Q: Is it true that the beverage industry targets children with soft drink advertising?

A: No. America’s beverage companies understand the responsibilities associated with marketing to children. That’s why, under their Global Policy on Marketing to Children, they will not advertise any products other than juice, water and milk-based drinks to any audience predominantly comprised of children under the age of 12. This policy covers a wide range of marketing outlets including television, radio, print, Internet, phone messaging and cinema, including product placement.

A 2011 review showed that between 2004-2010, soft drink advertising to children in the United States decreased by 96 percent, while it increased 199 percent for fruit and vegetable juices.

Source:Georgetown Economic Services, 2011

TAGS: ,