Posts tagged with "ingredients"

Myth

Low- and no-calorie sweeteners increase appetite.

Fact

Low- and no-calorie sweeteners have no effect on appetite, but here’s how they can help. Since they make low-calorie foods and beverages tastier, they make it easier to follow a lower-calorie regimen. This is well established among those who strive to eat a balanced diet. The federal government’s National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) found that people who eat a balanced diet are also likely to drink low- and no-calorie beverages. Results from the government’s Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals and the Diet Health and Knowledge Survey reveal that people who consume low-calorie foods and beverages are more aware of what they eat, eat a more balanced diet and consume fewer daily calories.

Source: The Journal of Nutrition & Journal of Food Science.

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Myth

Drinking low- and no-calorie beverages leads to a desire for sweets.

Fact

Scientific research in humans shows that sugar substitutes do not cause sweet cravings, nor do they cause hunger. In the recent Choose Healthy Options Consciously Everyday (CHOICE) study, researchers compared low- and no-calorie beverages with water and found that neither caused food cravings. In fact, the diet beverage drinkers ate less dessert than those who drank water alone. Meanwhile, a scientific review paper that gathered the findings of multiple studies done with children and teens as participants found no evidence that low- and no-calorie sweeteners prompted snacking or overeating at meals.

Source:The British Journal of Nutrition, The Journal of Nutrition, The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, & International Journal of Pediatric Obesity 

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Myth

The low-calorie sweetener, aspartame, is unsafe.

Fact

Aspartame is a commonly used low-calorie sweetener that has been extensively tested and declared safe by governmental and independent organizations all over the world. Both the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) have found it to be safe for use in foods and beverages.

In fact, EFSA reaffirmed that aspartame is safe for consumption by the general population as recently as December 2013. This opinion is based on the most comprehensive risk assessments of aspartame to-date.

According to decades of scientific research, aspartame can be an effective tool in both weight loss and weight management. It is also recommended as a sugar substitute by the American Diabetes Association.

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Myth

High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) is high in fructose

Fact

HFCS is composed of 55 percent fructose and 45 percent glucose, as compared to table sugar which is 50 percent fructose and 50 percent glucose. Two types of HFCS are used in beverages: HFCS 55 (55% fructose) and HFCS 42 (42% fructose), with glucose making up the rest of the sweetener, just as in table sugar (sucrose).

Fructose coexists in a mixture with glucose in all common sweeteners that have calories, including honey, agave nectar and table sugar. Fructose is a simple fruit sugar widely found naturally in foods such as fruits and vegetables.

When compared to other carbohydrates contributing the same amount of calories, fructose has no significant effects on weight gain, blood pressure or uric acid. Many experimental studies which claim fructose pose metabolic risks examine fructose consumption in a “pure” form (i.e. without any accompanying glucose) and at levels which far exceed sugar consumption based on what we know of from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). These studies do not mirror reality as it is unlikely that any diet provides pure fructose and even the heaviest consumers of fructose and sugar consume less than is tested.

Existing evidence has shown that weight gain occurs from the consumption of calories from any source – if not burned off through physical activity and normal metabolic processes.

Source:American Journal of Clinical Nutrition The Journal of Nutrition Food and Chemical Toxicology Experimental Biology 2012 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

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Myth

High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) causes obesity and diabetes.

Fact

Actually, the American Medical Association has concluded that HFCS, a common liquid sweetener made from corn, is not a unique contributor to either obesity or type 2 diabetes. In fact, HFCS is so similar to sucrose (table sugar) that your body can’t tell the difference between the two, and processes both in the same way.

Despite its name, HFCS it is not high in fructose and, just like sucrose, it is a combination of two simple sugars – glucose and fructose.

Source:American Medical Association

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Myth

Increased sugar consumption is largely to blame for America’s obesity epidemic.

Fact

According to USDA data, sugar actually plays a minor role in additional calories in the American diet, most of which come from fats, oils and starches.

During the past four decades as obesity rates climbed, the American food supply added an additional 445 calories per day. While fats, oils and starches comprised 376 (84%) of these additional calories, sugar – from all sources – played a relatively minor role, contributing only 34 calories (9%).

Calories from soft drinks played an even smaller role in this increase. In fact, CDC data shows that foods, not beverages, are the top source of sugars in the American Diet.

Source:U.S. Department of Agriculture Centers for Disease Control & Prevention

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Fact:

Leading energy drink makers voluntarily:

•display total caffeine amounts – from all sources – on their packages;
•display an advisory statement on their packages indicating that the product is not intended (or recommended) for children, pregnant or nursing women, or persons sensitive to caffeine; and
•do not market energy drinks to children or sell or market them in K-12 schools.

These labeling and marketing guidelines, among others, are included in the American Beverage Association’s Guidance for the Responsible Labeling and Marketing of Energy Drinks.

Fact:

Guarana, an ingredient found in some energy drinks, is a nut-like seed from plants native to South America and is a natural source of caffeine. Guarana contributes caffeine to beverages – just as coffee, tea, cocoa, yerba mate or other natural sources of caffeine do. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved guarana for use in foods and beverages.

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Fact:

Taurine, a common ingredient in energy drinks, is an amino acid that is naturally found in the human body, as well as in food items such as seafood, scallops and poultry. Because taurine exists naturally in breast milk, it is also used as an additive in infant formula, one of the most researched products sold.

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Fact:

Fact: Many of the common ingredients found in energy drinks occur naturally in other foods that we enjoy regularly such as seafood, poultry and grains, as well as plants.

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