Posts tagged with "beverages"

Myth

With the recent growth of the energy drink category, Americans are getting dangerous amounts of caffeine in their diet.

Fact

The FDA commissioned an in-depth analysis of caffeine consumption among the U.S. population in 2009, which was then updated in 2010. This report concludes that, despite the growth of energy drinks in the marketplace, the average amount of caffeine consumed by the adult U.S. population remains consistent with past FDA estimates – at approximately 300 milligrams of caffeine daily. The report also found that coffee and tea remain the primary source of caffeine in the American diet. Furthermore, that same report indicated that teens and young adults ages 14 to 21 years consume, on average, approximately one-third the amount of caffeine as people over 21 – about 100 milligrams per day – and that most of their caffeine consumption is from beverages other than energy drinks.

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Myth

Soda is to blame for America’s obesity epidemic.

Fact

According to a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (AJCN) (Welsh, 2011) there has been a 24% decrease in added sugars over the past decade. Two-thirds of this decline came from decreased sugar consumption. Another study published in the AJCN (Kit, et. al. 2013) found on average, children are consuming 68 fewer calories from sugar-sweetened beverages between 1999-2010 and adults are consuming 45 fewer calories from soft drinks during the same time span.

This coincides with beverage marketing trends which have found a 12.5% decline in the sale of full calorie soft drinks since 2000.

During these categorical declines in sugar and soft drink consumption, obesity prevalence has remained high and stable according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Fact:

Fact: While energy drinks are a growing category they remain a niche product accounting for just under 2 percent of the total U.S. non-alcoholic beverages market.

Source:Source: Beverage Marketing Corporation

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Myth

There’s no way for a consumer to know how much caffeine is in their beverage.

Fact

There are several ways to find out exactly how much caffeine is in your beverage. Most beverage companies voluntarily list the total amount of caffeine from all sources right on the label. In addition, this information is readily available on company or product websites, as well as through their toll-free numbers.

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Myth

Youth are major consumers of energy drinks.

Fact

A report on caffeine consumption among the U.S. population commissioned by FDA in 2009, and then updated in 2010 and again in 2012, indicated that teens and young adults ages 14 to 21 years consume, on average, approximately one-third the amount of caffeine as people over 21 – about 100 milligrams per day – and that most of their caffeine consumption is from beverages other than energy drinks. Importantly, the 2012 report also showed that the average amount of caffeine consumed has remained constant.

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Myth

Energy drinks aren’t regulated.

Fact

Energy drinks, their ingredients and labeling are regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)— even those that are labeled as a dietary supplement using a Supplement Facts panel, instead of a conventional food using a Nutrition Facts panel. And, as with most consumer products, energy drink advertising is subject to oversight from the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC).

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Myth

Energy drinks have “high” or “dangerous” amounts of caffeine.

Fact

The vast majority of energy drinks consumed in the United States – including Monster, Red Bull, Rockstar, AMP, Full Throttle and NOS – have similar or lower levels of caffeine than home-brewed coffee which many Americans enjoy on a daily basis. And many contain about half the caffeine of a similarly-sized coffeehouse coffee. A 16 fluid ounce energy drink typically contains between 160 and 240 milligrams of caffeine, while the same size coffeehouse coffee contains around 300 to 330 milligrams. Moreover, caffeine has been safely consumed around the world for hundreds of years.

Source:Mayo Clinic

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Fact:

There has been a 23% reduction in the average calories per serving from beverages sold between 1998 and 2010.

Myth

The obesity epidemic can be reversed if people stop drinking soda.

Fact

Sugar-sweetened beverages account for only 6% of calories in the average American’s diet, according to government data. With 94% of our calories coming from other foods and beverages, meaningful steps to reduce obesity need to look at the bigger picture.

Obesity is a complex problem that cannot be solved by focusing on a small piece of the total diet. Science shows that being overweight or obese is caused by an imbalance between “calories in,” the calories we consume through all foods and beverages, and “calories out,” those we burn through basic body functions, daily activities and regular exercise. We also know that variables such as lifestyle, genetics, age, culture, income and more play a role. Focusing on one product — soda — ignores the bigger problem and doesn’t offer real solutions.

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Q & A

Q: Does drinking diet soda cause weight gain?

A: No. In fact, diet sodas, which are 99 percent water, have been proven to be an effective tool for weight loss and weight maintenance.

When it comes to obesity, all calories count, regardless of their source. Science has shown that the key to maintaining a healthy weight is energy balance, that is balancing calories consumed with calories burned. Many people trying to lose weight often switch to diet beverages that contain low-calorie sweeteners as a way to reduce their caloric intake.

According to the American Diabetes Association and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (formerly the American Dietetic Association), low-calorie sweeteners can help reduce calories and sugar intake and aid in maintaining a healthy weight.

Source:De La Hunty, A., Gibson, S. and Ashwell, M. (2006), A review of the effectiveness of aspartame in helping with weight control. Nutrition Bulletin, 31: 115–128;

American Diabetes Association

Phelan S, Lang W, Jordan D, Wing RR. Use of artificial sweeteners and fat-modified foods in weight loss maintainers and always-normal weight individuals. Int J Obes (Lond). 2009 Oct;33(10):1183-90.

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

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